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The Yunnan Black

SKU: BY01
€6.00
Weight: 0 g
50 grams packaging, €6.00

In stock

The Yunnan Black

Yunnan Black TeaYunnan Black

Black Tea

 

"Yunnan Black is a high grade and very smooth earthy black tea from Yunnan containing many tea-buds."

 

 

Name: Dianhong, Yunnan Black

Yunnan BlackCategory: Soft, mild, sweet

Impression: The leaves are small and tightly rolled, on the leaves is a small bright fuzz

Taste: More subtle and milder than ordinary black tea

Origin: Fengqing, Yunnan, 2013
 

Review at Steepster (summer 2013): This is a very smooth and sweet tea. It has an Yunnan Blackearthy character with malty undertones. The sweetness precludes it from tasting too earthy.

Brewing Instructions: Use around 2 - 3 grams of Yunnan Black Tea per glass and add hot water (90 degrees). To prepare half a liter of this tea, use around 5 grams depending on your personal preference. Don't start with too much tea, otherwise the tea will become bitter. Steep the tea for a few seconds if you like mild tea and a little more than a minute if you like strong tea. When using the kungfu tea set, add 3 grams of tea and steep for around 20. It's not necessary to wash this tea, but it doesn't hurt. Most serious tea drinkers have developed the habit of always washing the tea once Yunnan Blackbefore drinking We recommend using thin glass or porcelain for drinking this tea. 

Yunnan Black Tea has two main characteristics: taste and color. The taste is not like a normal black tea, instead it is much more subtle, round and sweet. The amber color makes this tea truly one of a kind.

 

While Yunnan Province is most famous for its Puerh Tea, you can also find green, white and black teas in the mountains of Yunnan. The most famous black tea from Yunnan is known as Dian Hong. This name is derived from the province’s name and the color of the tea. ‘Dian’ is another name for Yunnan and ‘hong’ means red. What is known as black tea in the west is actually called red tea in China due to the deep red hues that are associated with a freshly brewed ‘red’ tea. Every April, the tea-pickers go into the mountains to find the best leaves for processing a special tea with a deep and beautiful amber color.